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New vantage, same Vintage

Passion for wine motivates Vintage 1740’s relocation



Matt Sanders outside the new location of Vintage wine bar in the Blue Dome District

Greg Bollinger

Over the past 13 years, Vintage 1740 created a name for itself as an intimate wine bar and established a strong local following. Its Victorian-esque aesthetic features ornate couches, floral patterns, and a plethora of wall art. Many regulars formed personal connections with the space, which is why it might come as a surprise that the business is relocating.

When owner Matt Sanders began working at Vintage twelve years ago, the look and feel of the place were already established. Now that the concept has matured, he’s ready to implement his vision of how to tailor space toward hospitality and experience.

This speaks to the core of what Vintage 1740 has always been—a place for guests to socialize and learn as much or as little about wine as they’d like. “I can’t have everybody over to my house,” Sanders said, “but I can have everybody over to my bar.”

As part of the relocation, they’ll drop the “1740” from the name, as it was associated with the original address.

Plans for the move have been in the works since August 2016, and the new location at East 1st Street and and South Elgin Avenue (beneath The First Ward hair studio) will open in early July. The space is owned by Tulsa-based Hygge Properties, who contracted Workstead, a boutique design studio founded in Brooklyn, to create the interior design.

Workstead’s team spent time in downtown Tulsa studying how to blend the new space seamlessly with the existing fabric of the community.

“We didn’t want this to feel like something in New York, Chicago, or Paris,” Sanders said.

Opting for timeless rather than trendy, they chose Art Deco as the motif. Every element from floor to ceiling will be crafted with a level of detail that aims to reveal new surprises with each visit.

“I knew going into this that the scale was going to be incredible based on the team we are collaborating with,” Sanders said. “Now that it’s all visually coming together is surreal.”

The menu won’t undergo any significant changes and the new space will not be more formal or any larger.

“We’re still a bar. We’re not a fine dining restaurant,” Sanders said. “I cannot and will not ever be further from that.”

Vintage will offer a wide selection of small-production wines, a concise list of classic cocktails, and three local beers. They plan to improve their meat and cheese plate options, but there are no plans to serve anything other than simple finger foods.

Sanders assures that it’s going to be the same Vintage, just in a space tailored to better deliver a hospitable wine experience. That Vintage will still feature patio seating with a fireplace, serve Chambongs, and, most importantly, host Rosé Party 2019 confirm this.

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